State Laws
Read the laws regulating home education in Idaho and browse through the case law and legal opinions relating to those laws, along with government publications relating to homeschooling and summaries of the laws.
Summaries and Explanations of Idaho Homeschooling Laws
Home School in Idaho
This Idaho Department of Education page states that Idaho does not regulate or monitor home school education. This web page is intended to provide answers to frequently asked questions regarding home school in Idaho.
Idaho Home School Laws from HSLDA
The Home School Legal Defense Association provides a brief summary of the homeschooling laws in Idaho. Includes a link to a legal analysis of laws relating to homeschooling in Idaho.
Common Questions And Plain Answers About Home Schooling in Idaho
Answers to some of the basic questions about homeschooling in Idaho. Includes interpretations of the relevant laws.
Frequently Asked Questions
Provided by the Idaho State Department of Education, this list of questions and answers addresses some of the basics of legally homeschooling in Idaho.
Idaho Statutes Pertaining to Home Education
33-207. Proceedings Against Parents or Guardians.
Whenever the parents or guardians of any child between the ages of seven (7) years, as qualified in section 33-202, Idaho Code, and sixteen (16) years, have failed, neglected or refused to place the child in school as provided in this chapter or to have the child comparably instructed, or knowingly have allowed a pupil to become an habitual truant, proceedings shall be brought against such parent or guardian under the provisions of the juvenile corrections act.
33-203. Dual Enrollment.
(1) The parent or guardian of a child of school age who is enrolled in a nonpublic school or a public charter school shall be allowed to enroll the student in a public school for dual enrollment purposes. The board of trustees of the school district shall adopt procedures governing enrollment pursuant to this section. If enrollment in a specific program reaches the maximum for the program, priority for enrollment shall be given to a student who is enrolled full time in the public noncharter school. (2) Any student participating in dual enrollment may enter into any program in the public school available to other students subject to compliance with the eligibility requirements herein and the same responsibilities and standards of behavior and performance that apply to any student's participation in the activity, except that the academic eligibility requirements for participation in nonacademic activities are as provided for herein. (3) Any school district shall be allowed to include dual-enrolled nonpublic school and public charter school students for the purposes of state funding only to the extent of the student's participation in the public school programs. (4) Oversight of academic standards relating to participation in nonacademic public school activities shall be the responsibility of the primary educational provider for that student. In order for any nonpublic school student or public charter school student to participate in nonacademic public school activities for which public school students must demonstrate academic proficiency or eligibility, the nonpublic school or public charter school student shall demonstrate composite grade-level academic proficiency on any state board of education recognized achievement test, portfolio, or other mechanism as provided for in state board of education rules. Additionally, a student shall be eligible if he achieves a minimum composite, core or survey test score within the average or higher than average range as established by the test service utilized on any nationally-normed test. Demonstrated proficiency shall be used to determine eligibility for the current and next following school years. School districts shall provide to nonpublic students who wish to participate in dual enrollment activities the opportunity to take state tests or other standardized tests given to all regularly enrolled public school students. (5) A public school student who has been unable to maintain academic eligibility is ineligible to participate in nonacademic public school activities as a nonpublic school or public charter school student for the duration of the school year in which the student becomes academically ineligible and for the following academic year. (6) A nonpublic school or public charter school student participating in nonacademic public school activities must reside within the attendance boundaries of the school for which the student participates. (7) Dual enrollment shall include the option of joint enrollment in a regular public school and an alternative public school program. The state board of education shall establish rules that provide funding to school districts for each student who participates in both a regular public school program and an alternative public school program. (8) Dual enrollment shall include the option of enrollment in a post-secondary institution. Any credits earned from an accredited post-secondary institution shall be credited toward state board of education high school graduation requirements. (9) A nonpublic student is any student who receives educational instruction outside a public school classroom and such instruction can include, but is not limited to, a private school or a home school.
33-201. School Age.
The services of the public schools of this state are extended to any acceptable person of school age. "School age" is defined as including all persons resident of the state, between the ages of five (5) and twenty-one (21) years. For the purposes of this section, the age of five (5) years shall be attained when the fifth anniversary of birth occurs on or before the first day of September of the school year in which the child is to enroll in kindergarten. For a child enrolling in the first grade, the age of six (6) years must be reached on or before the first day of September of the school year in which the child is to enroll. Any child of the age of five (5) years who has completed a private or public out-of-state kindergarten for the required four hundred fifty (450) hours but has not reached the "school age" requirement in Idaho shall be allowed to enter the first grade. For resident children with disabilities who qualify for special education and related services under the federal individuals with disabilities education act (IDEA) and subsequent amendments thereto, and applicable state and federal regulations, "school age" shall begin at the attainment of age three (3) and shall continue through the semester of school in which the student attains the age of twenty-one (21) years.
Home School Laws from HSLDA
Find the laws pertaining to home education for all 50 states and U.S. territories.
33-202. School Attendance Compulsory.
The parent or guardian of any child resident in this state who has attained the age of seven (7) years at the time of the commencement of school in his district, but not the age of sixteen (16) years, shall cause the child to be instructed in subjects commonly and usually taught in the public schools of the state of Idaho. Unless the child is otherwise comparably instructed, the parent or guardian shall cause the child to attend a public, private or parochial school during a period in each year equal to that in which the public schools are in session; there to conform to the attendance policies and regulations established by the board of trustees, or other governing body, operating the school attended.
Case Law and Legal Opinions
Pierce v. Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary
In Pierce v. Society of the Sisters, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that "the fundamental theory of liberty upon which all governments of this Union repose excludes any general power of the state to standardize its children by forcing them to accept instruction from public teachers only. The child is not the creature of the state."
Government Publications
Home School in Idaho
A compilation of resources, Idaho laws and other information designed for parents or guardians considering home school. Written by Shannon Page, Accreditation/Elementary Services Coordinator, Idaho Department of Education.
Looking for Another State?
Featured Products

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links on this site.

Teach Me to Do It Myself: Montessori Activities for You and Your Child
Based on the key Montessori principle that children learn best through active experience, Teach Me to Do It Myself presents simple activities through which children explore and develop their skills. These skill areas include sensory perceptions, body coordination, language, understanding of numbers, and movement. This practical, color-illustrated parenting book is filled with activities and instructions for overseeing children as they carry out a variety of learning activities. Most activities w...
Responsible Driving, Student Edition
This easy-to-read book features explanations of safe driving techniques and is used in many states as a textbook for in-class driving instruction. It is a great learning tool for a new driver and a good refresher for the more experienced driver.
Basic Montessori: Learning Activities for Under-Fives
For the first time, Basic Montessori opens the celebrated philosophy and method to a more general public. David Gettman has devised a clear and modern explanation of Montessori's revolutionary ideas about early intellectual development, and provides a step-by-step guide to the Montessori learning activities most commonly used with under-fives. These include activities for introducing reading and writing, counting and decimal concepts, science, and geography, as well as activities that help dev...
Freedom Challenge: African American Homeschoolers
Why don't more African Americans school their children at home? By many accounts, there is every reason to avoid public schools, with their low academic expectations for black children, their general avoidance of black history, and their reputation for violence and negative peer pressure. The reason may be found in the opening pages of Freedom Challenge, a collection of essays by people of color who homeschool. "I can't do it because I'm black," one teenager sadly insists after listening to a sp...
Conquering Chronic Disorganization
The real-life stories of chronically disorganized people and the ground breaking, easy-to-learn organizing methods used to end their chronic disorganization in the area of residential clutter, office organizing, paper management, storage, and time management. Conquerings pages includes an extensive index, user-friendly summaries, quick tips, helpful photographs, and a resource section of products and organizations.